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The world's largest low-temperature district heating network is in Lund

Low temperature district heating networks can be built everywhere.
- Martin Gierow, Product Manager at Kraftringen

Brunnshög in Lund is home to the world's largest low-temperature district heating network, which is heated without fossil fuels. The MAX IV laboratory has been heating the city there for several years by recovering the residual heat from the laboratory and turning it into district heating. Since 2023, the ESS research facility has also been contributing heat to the network. The low-temperature district heating network is being built by the energy company Kraftringen, and it is hoped that other parts of Lund will also receive low-temperature heat in the networks in the future. In this way, Lund can grow - without increasing emissions from district heating.

The expansion of the district heating network at Brunnshög began in 2020, when the network's main pipeline was built and the first customers were connected. The heart of the network is the energy center at the MAX IV research facility, where Kraftringen delivers cooling to the research facility and recycles the heat to the district heating network. The network at Brunnshög is being expanded as new buildings come on site and the plan is for the network to continue to grow for many more years.

Reduced cost of district heating production
New technology with bendable plastic pipes that are cheaper to bury
The system also heats tram stops

Opportunities for low temperature district heating networks

Pictured: Martin Gierow, Product Manager at Kraftringen
Pictured: Martin Gierow, Product Manager at Kraftringen

Brunnshög has unique conditions with research facilities and a new district emerging. Could low-temperature district heating be suitable for other locations?

Yes! Low-temperature district heating networks can be built wherever new business or residential areas are built. If there is also recyclable heat in the vicinity of these areas, it is even better.

Kraftringen has dared to try something new in this initiative. Do you have any recommendations for other cities that want to do something similar?

Trying out new technologies and/or new business models is always challenging for a business. In our case, we did quite thorough investigations and risk analyses before we put the shovel in the ground, which means that we have felt relatively safe despite the fact that it was a little unknown technology for us and our customers.

Do you think low-temperature district heating is the "new normal"?

I think we will see gradually decreasing temperatures in all types of district heating networks. In many new construction areas, low-temperature networks will certainly be built.

The low-temperature district heating network was installed in the context of the EU COOL DH project.

Five facts about low temperature district heating

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Contact us

Martin Gierow, Product Manager at Kraftringen, martin.gierow@kraftringen.se 

Climate neutral Lund 2030